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English

Why we teach English

At Melbourn Village College, our English team is committed to inspiring young minds by encouraging students to be imaginative and creative. We give our students the confidence to experiment and take risks with their writing. We want our students to have the determination, perseverance, and true grit to succeed in a broad subject that opens many new doors and exciting opportunities for the future. Our students develop self-expression and fluency in their writing, self-confidence in presenting their ideas, and the capability to use language to communicate effectively and present themselves to their best advantage. Through a range of modules they engage with the many different spheres of learning English. Students study a Shakespeare play every year; read and interpret a range of modern novels; explore the world of poetry; and discover many genres of writing, using language in different forms for a range of audiences. As part of our enriched curriculum we also offer opportunities for students to get involved in a range of events throughout the year. These help to extend, embed and strengthen the skills developed during their lessons which will in turn, benefit them throughout their life.

KS3 English

Overview of content

We have an excellent range of modules that underpin all our values of encouraging students to be imaginative and creative. Students study a Shakespeare play in Yr7 and Yr8; read and interpret a range of modern novels; explore the world of poetry; and learn about many genres of writing, using language in different forms for a range of audiences. Our Year 7 curriculum focuses on introducing the skills and style of questions they will need to be familiar with at GCSE, which they will then build upon every year through a variety of different texts.

Yr 7 Programme of Study

Half term

Topics studied; skills and knowledge

How this will be assessed

Autumn - 1

Reading and analysing fiction:  As students embark upon the next exciting stage of their journey of developing their English skills, they will be immersed in literature from different periods and different cultural settings. Some of the fiction they will read will be familiar to them from KS2, but they will be challenged to extend and deepen their skills of inference and analysis. Students will be introduced to the skills of interpreting implicit meanings, analysing a writer’s language and structural choices, and be encouraged to think critically when evaluating their views in response to the fiction they read.

Students will be given a range of thought-provoking questions, which will encourage them to draw upon their skills of inference, supported with reference to the text. The assessment will be one hour.

Autumn - 2

Writing (Transactional): Giving a voice to young people has never been more important, and in this unit, students will be introduced to a range of non-fiction texts through which they will experience the power of persuasion in the written word, from campaigners including Martin Luther King and Greta Thunberg.Students will be introduced to the art of persuasion through two different formats: text for a leaflet and text for a speech. Students will build upon the skill of precising longer passages from KS2 and be introduced to extended writing. They will learn how to use vocabulary, grammar, punctuation and tone to plan, develop, edit and complete successful persuasive pieces, with careful consideration to audience, purpose and format.

Students will put their persuasive skills to the test with the task of writing the text for a speech. The assessment will be one hour.

Autumn - 2 (2 weeks)

Poetry festival: students will have the opportunity to learn and perform poems from the ‘Poetry by Heart’ website, which they will be familiar with from key stage 2. Stepping onto the stage, they will have the exciting opportunity to creatively plan and perform class, group and individual poems, in front of a positive audience.

No assessment

Spring - 1

Literature (Shakespeare – ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’): “The course of true love never did run smooth,” comments Lysander, articulating one of A Midsummer Night's Dream's most important themes—that of the difficulty of love. Key stage 2 students will be familiar with a range of Shakespearean stories, and in year 7, students will be introduced to the skills of interpreting and understanding events, characters and themes, as well as looking at Shakespeare’s use of language, form and structure.

Moving beyond the story, students will be asked to offer their point of view in response to an extract and essay question, using quotations to support their perspective. The assessment will be one hour.

Spring - 2

Reading (19th and 21st Century non-fiction texts): It is not the prisoners who need reformation. It is the prisons.’ Oscar Wilde. Students will be exploring themed texts from the 19th and 21st century, focusing on changing attitudes and practice towards children and animals. These texts will focus on crime and punishment, from the perspective of a child, and the way in which we treat animals in captivity.Students will build on their skills from key stage 2, of retrieving, recording and presenting information from non-fiction texts and be introduced to analysing language techniques, comparing writers’ perspectives and skills in summarising texts, as well as making comparisons between texts from different periods and perspectives.

Students will be given a 21st and 19th century non-fiction source and they will answer a range of reading and comprehension questions in which they will reflect of the different views and perspectives of the writers. The assessment will be one hour.

Summer - 1

Literature (Private Peaceful’): Don't wish. Remember. Remembrances are real.’ Tommo, Private Peaceful, Michael Morpurgo. In this introduction to a modern prose text, students will be exposed to themes of war, conflict, relationships, family, growing up, love, disability, bullying, blame, guilt and grief. Students will be encouraged to think about the writer’s craft in responding to events and characters in the novel.

Moving on from their previous literature module, students will be given an extract and guided questions to answer, encouraging students to think about the writer’s craft, as well as interpreting meaning. The assessment will be one hour.

Summer - 2

Writing (narrative): Storytelling is key to the enjoyment of literature and in this unit, students will open a window to their own imagination and creativity.In this unit, students will be introduced to more complex ways of structuring a narrative, developing a character and creating an atmosphere. As a corollary, students will build on the skills of using grammar, language and punctuation to change and enhance meaning from key stage 2. They will be introduced to the skills of experimenting with a variety of sentence types to create mood and communicate meaning. Speaking & Listening (inform/explain): The ability to devise, deliver and successfully communicate verbally is key. In this unit, working with Drama, students will be introduced to the skill of oratory. They will learn how to give a successful speech for the purpose of informing and explaining.

To show their independent use of the skills of structuring and using language that have been introduced, students will be given an image and asked to plan and produce a story in response to the image. The assessment will be one hour.

 

Speaking & Listening (inform/explain): The ability to devise, deliver and successfully communicate verbally is key. In this unit, working with Drama, students will be introduced to the skill of oratory. They will learn how to give a successful speech for the purpose of informing and explaining.

Students will be asked to give an individual presentation with the purpose to inform/explain.

Yr 8 Programme of Study

Half term

Topics studied; skills and knowledge

How this will be assessed

Autumn - 1

Reading (‘Thursday’s Child’ or ‘Holes’): a choice of two texts, both of which incorporate myth and realism in an exciting way. Through the rich symbolism of these narratives, which offer story-telling against the backdrop of poverty and struggle, Students will develop their skills of interpreting implicit meanings, analysing a writer’s language and structural choices, and be encouraged to think critically when evaluating their views in response to the fiction they read.

Students will demonstrate how they have developed their understanding of inference and analysis, introduced to them in year 7 by answering a broad range of reading and comprehension questions in direct response to the more challenging texts that they have studied this year. The assessment will be one hour.

Autumn - 2

Writing (Transactional): Writing entertaining and informative texts offers students the opportunity to use personal perspectives and to add tone to their writing and this unit will introduce them to the genres of travel writing and autobiography, including important works such as Anne Frank’s diary, as well as longer feature articles, whilst developing writing skills introduced in year 7 and learning new approaches to communicate to an audience.

Students will be presented with the challenge of writing to entertain and explain in a journalistic text. Students will be given the opportunity to research, plan and complete their text, explaining their views in response to an exam question. The assessment will be one hour.

Autumn - 2 (2 weeks)

Poetry festival: students will have the opportunity to learn and perform poems of their choice on a range of themes. Stepping onto the stage, they will have the exciting opportunity to creatively plan and perform class, group and individual poems, in front of a positive audience.

No assessment.

Spring - 1

Literature (Shakespeare – ‘Twelfth Night’): confusion, love and hidden identities are at the heart of this comedic play by Shakespeare. Students will develop their skills of interpreting and understanding events, characters and themes, as well as looking at Shakespeare’s use of language, form and structure.

Students will be given planning time to consider their response to a question on character and the theme of bullying in the play. They will be asked to write an essay in response to an evaluative question. The assessment will be one hour.

Spring - 2

Reading (range of 19th and 21st century non-fiction extracts): ‘The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there.’ L.P Hartley, The Go-Between.
Students will explore themes within teaching and education, mines and factories, the movement for women’s rights (the suffrage movement) and a collection of famous speeches from the 19th to the 21st centuries. Students will develop their skills in analysing language techniques, comparing writers’ perspectives and skills in summarising texts, as well as making comparisons between texts from different periods and perspectives.

Students will be given a 19th century and either a 20th or 21st century source and they will answer a range of reading and comprehension questions in which they will reflect of the different views and perspectives of the writers. The assessment will be one hour.

Summer - 1

Literature (Poetry): As Shakespeare wrote, love ‘is an ever-fixed mark’. As a constant feature of human relationships, students will be introduced a variety of poems on the theme of love and relationships, from Poet Laureates, Shakespeare and contemporary poets.
After encountering poetry at key stage 2, students will be introduced to the skills of identifying a poet’s meaning, message, purpose; use of language, structure and form; and identifying similarities and differences between poems.

Students will be given a set poem to analyse and the autonomy to choose another poem from within the unit with which to compare it. Students will interpret how both poets display their perspective on love and relationships and how these views are communicated through language and structure. The assessment will be one hour.

Summer - 2

Writing (descriptive): A key part of the English canon, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales offers a vivid window onto medieval characters and lives. In studying characters from this work, students will continue to develop their creative writing skills, honing their description of character in this unit.

As a corollary, students will continue to develop their skills in using grammar, punctuation, vocabulary and sentence types to achieve specific effects.

Students will be asked to produce a piece of creative writing that introduces and describes an entertaining, vivid and imaginative character. The assessment will be one hour.

 

Speaking & Listening (persuade): The ability to devise, deliver and successfully communicate verbally is key. In this unit, working with Drama, students will be introduced to the skill of oratory. They will learn how to give a successful speech for the purpose of persuading their audience.

Students will be asked to give an individual presentation with the purpose to persuade.

Yr 9 Programme of Study

Half term

Topics studied; skills and knowledge

How this will be assessed

Autumn - 1

Reading (range of 20th and 21st century fiction extracts): Complex, contemporary issues including politics, inclusion and racism are just some of the provocative and thought-provoking topics year 9 will encounter in this unit. Students will extend their skills of interpreting implicit meanings, analysing a writer’s language and structural choices, and be encouraged to think critically when evaluating their views in response to the fiction they read.

Having a studied a range of texts that explore complex issues, students will demonstrate how they have extended their skills of inference and analysis, developed in year 8, by responding to an unseen text. Whilst the questions will be familiar to those encountered in year 8, students will offer a thoughtful response to a more challenging extract. They will answer a range of exam questions, which will assess their reading and comprehension. The assessment will be one hour.

Autumn - 2

Writing (Transactional): students often have strong, emotive opinions and this unit encourages them to develop their points of view into successful, reasoned arguments, as well as acknowledging opposing voices.

Students will extend their knowledge of different forms and purposes of writing and be introduced to the art of constructing and delivering a successful argument to offer a reader in the formal settings of a feature article and a formal letter. Students will be encouraged to take a standpoint or view on a complex, emotive subject, controlling their argument successfully to convince a reader.

Students will be asked to write an article with the purpose to argue their points of view on a controversial topic, using a balanced, rational and reasoned argument. The assessment will be one hour.

Spring - 1

Literature (War Poetry):‘A poem begins with a lump in the throat’ Robert Frost. Students will be introduced to emotive poetry about conflict and war from the nineteenth, twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Students will go on later to study a poetry anthology for their GCSE course, so this is a foundation unit to introduce them to a wider range of poets and poems on the theme of war.

Students will extend their skills of identifying a poet’s meaning, message, purpose; use of language, structure and form; and identifying similarities and differences between poems.

Students will be given two war poems, offering opposing views relating to war and will be asked to write a comparison essay in response to an exam question. The assessment will be one hour.

Spring - 2

Reading (range of 19th and 20th  century non-fiction extracts): Focusing on the themes of travel and expeditions across centuries, including Isabella Bird, Bear Grylls, and modern texts on Zimbabwe. Students will extend their skills in analysing language techniques, comparing writers’ perspectives and skills in summarising texts, as well as making comparisons between texts from different periods and perspectives.

Students will be given a 19th and either 20th or 21st century non-fiction source and they will answer a range of reading and comprehension questions in which they will reflect of the different views and perspectives of the writers. The assessment will be one hour.

Summer - 1

Literature (‘Anita and Me’): Family discipline and guidance, culture and belonging, friendship, racism and violence, and truth vs lies are key themes explored in this novel by Meera Syal, set in the 1960s.

Students will extend their skills of understanding and interpreting meaning(s); identifying and analysing features of language, structure and form; and looking at how context contributes to understanding of a text.

Students will be given a choice of responding to a character or theme, closed-book question in relation to ‘Anita and Me’. Students will be extending their capacity to write in an essay form, using their own knowledge of the text to support their argument. The assessment will be one hour.

Summer - 2

Writing – (narrative/descriptive):

“If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot. There's no way around these two things that I'm aware of, no shortcut.” ― Stephen King 

Students will extend their skills of creative writing through the medium of short stories and narrative descriptions. They will be exposed to a wider range of literary techniques and figurative devices to enhance their understanding and to enrich their skills in creative writing. As a corollary, students will continue to extend their skills in using grammar, punctuation, vocabulary and sentence types to achieve specific effects.

Students will be given autonomy in their creative writing by being offered a choice of an image, or a title, for which they will be asked to produce a narrative or descriptive piece of writing. The assessment will be one hour.

 

Speaking & Listening (argue): The ability to devise, deliver and successfully communicate verbally is key. In this unit, working with Drama, students will be introduced to the skill of oratory. They will learn how to give a successful speech for the purpose of arguing their perspective.

Students will be asked to give an individual presentation with the purpose to argue.

Homework

Homework will be set once a week and students are expected to spend forty minutes completing it to the best of their ability. The types of homework set can include wider reading around a topic/subject we are studying, research in connection with a topic, literacy, or the class teacher may set something specific in connection with the tasks being completed in lessons.

Learning outside the classroom

Every year we run the KS3 Poetry Festival, which is a fantastic opportunity for students to collaborate and experience their moment on the stage performing their chosen poem. It is always very successful and enjoyed by the students and staff. We often run various writing competitions, some of which are within our own school, but we also encourage students to take part in national competitions too. As a department, we welcome any ideas from students of events or competitions that they would like to take part in.

Parental support and extension

Feeling Inspired? Avoid the endless repeats on television by reading a novel.

Why not have a look at the following website links for some suggested books for reading?

The best support you can give your child to ensure they progress in English is to read with them and discuss what you have read together. There are also lots of useful websites with spelling, punctuation and grammar games/quizzes, which are an ideal way for students to develop their literacy skills independently.

More information

In terms of additional help that parents and carers can provide, please make sure that if you are able to, you ensure that your child uses a local public library to access as wide a range of reading material as possible. This is, of course, free. A dictionary and thesaurus are also excellent resources for students to have and to become accustomed to using when completing independent written tasks.

KS4 English

AQA GCSE English Language (8700) & GCSE English Literature (8702)

Overview of content

Students embark on their GCSE English Language and English Literature courses at the beginning of Year 10. The majority of the GCSE modules are studied during Year 10, which leaves time for revision of all of the modules in Year 11. At KS3, students have been introduced to the skills and types of questions they will experience for their GCSE examinations and are therefore familiar with what is expected of them by the time they start in Year 10. This approach at KS3 enables us to focus on developing students’ competence of reading and writing.

GCSE English Language: students will learn how to read, understand and interpret meanings of both fiction and non-fiction texts; they will learn how to analyse a writer’s use of methods; critically evaluate texts they read; and compare writers’ views and perspectives. Students will be taught how to write creatively and how to write for a specific form, purpose and audience. Accuracy skills are regularly visited within the course, particularly when we are focusing on writing skills.

GCSE English Literature: students will study a Shakespeare play, ‘Macbeth’ and a 19th Century novel, ‘A Christmas Carol’. They will be taught how to approach the exam questions for these modules, which require them to analyse a given extract and refer to other areas within the play/novel. Poetry is a heavy focus of the Literature course; students will need to know and learn a set of 15 poems from the Power & Conflict anthology and they will also be taught how to analyse poems they have not seen before, which is the focus of the ‘Unseen Poetry’ section of the Literature exam. In Year 11, students will study a modern play, ‘An Inspector Calls’ and they will be taught how to approach the exam question, which consists of two questions to choose from. These are usually separated into a character or a theme question.

KS4 Programme of Study

Year 10

 

 

Period of time

Area of study

Method of Assessment

Sept – Nov (8 weeks)

Literature Paper 1- section A: Macbeth

A vivid, exciting play with plenty of action and parallels to modern-day conflict, highlighting themes, including: power, ambition and equivocation, Macbeth is the first unit of work for GCSE.

Students will deepen their skills in understanding the historical, social and cultural context, linking this knowledge to their understanding of how the mechanics of the play work, focusing on the writer’s deliberate choices of language and structure, and how to communicate this information in an essay format.

Students will be given an extract from the play and asked to write an analytical essay, in which they respond to the extract and the play as a whole. Students will complete this assessment in their class, and it will last 45 minutes.

Nov – Dec (4 weeks)

Language paper 2 – section A (Non-Fiction)

‘Reading is an exercise in empathy; an exercise in walking in someone else’s shoes for a while.’ Malorie Blackman.

Students will be introduced to a range of non-fiction texts from the 19th to the 21st century, broadening the exposure of students to the work of writers on sport, children’s charities, war and healthcare.

Students will broaden their analytical skills from key stage 3 when considering the impact of language techniques, comparing writers’ perspectives and skills in summarising texts, as well as making comparisons between texts from different periods and perspectives.

Students will be given an extract from the 19th and either 20th or 21st century and they will answer a range of reading and comprehension questions in which they will reflect of the different views and perspectives of the writers. The assessment will be one hour in class.

Dec – Jan (6 weeks)

Literature paper 1 – section B: A Christmas Carol

‘The common welfare was my business; charity, mercy, forbearance, and benevolence, were all my business.’ Jacob Marley, A Christmas Carol.

One of the most influential texts from the 19th century, A Christmas Carol is taught at the most appropriate time of year and introduces year 11 students to the social and historical problems and attitudes in 19th century Britain. Students will explore Dickens’s incredibly rich language and description, whilst developing an understanding of the author’s purpose: social change.

Students will be given an extract from the play and asked to write an analytical essay, in which they respond to the extract and the play as a whole. Students will complete this assessment in-class and it will last 45 minutes.

 Jan – Mar (4 weeks)

Language paper 2 – Section B (Transactional writing)

‘If you want to change the world, pick up your pen and write’ Martin Luther King.

Students will broaden and deepen their knowledge of different forms, with a range of purposes and for a variety of audiences.

Students will build on their skills from key stage 3 in constructing pieces of writing that reveal their perspective. They will need to consider how they use language to create tone and meaning, as well as how to structure their text to achieve their purpose.

Students will be given a writing task in which they will have to consider their purpose, audience and format, to create an engaging piece of non-fiction writing. This will be an in-class assessment and will last 45 minutes.

Mar – Mar (3 weeks)

Language paper 1 – Section B (Creative writing)

“You can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have.” Maya Angelou.

Students will broaden and deepen their skills of creative writing through the medium of short stories and narrative descriptions. They will be exposed to a wider range of literary techniques and figurative devices to enhance their understanding and to enrich their skills in creative writing. As a corollary, students will broaden and deepen their skills in using grammar, punctuation, vocabulary and sentence types to achieve specific effects.

Students will be given a choice of producing a creative narrative or descriptive piece of writing, having been given an image as a stimulus. The assessment will be 45 minutes. In class assessment.

May – June (4 weeks)

Language paper 1 – Section A (Fiction)

Students will explore a range of exciting fictional extracts, drawn from a range of writers across the 20th and 21st century. Some of the titles include: Jamaica Inn, City of Bones, Rebecca, 1984 and A Monster Calls (which students are introduced to in year 7).

We refer to a broad range of extracts from different sources and centuries. Students will broaden and deepen their skills of interpreting implicit meanings, analysing a writer’s language and structural choices, and be encouraged to think critically when evaluating their views in response to the fiction they read.

Students will be given either a 20th or 21st century fiction source, and they will answer a range of exam questions, which will assess their ability to respond analytically and thoughtfully to show the depth of their understanding. The assessment will be one hour. In class assessment

Mid-June – end of term (3 weeks)

Unseen Poetry

“Poetry is like a bird; it ignores all frontiers.” —Yevgeny Yevtushenko

Students will get lost in a world of imagination and the condensed power of language to evoke emotion and thought.

Students will broaden and deepen their ability to understand and respond to a range of themed poetry that they will not have encountered before. They will broaden and deepen their understanding of the poet’s choices of language, structure and form to convey ideas and meanings.

Students will be given two poems, linked in theme, and asked firstly to respond to one poem with a focus on inference and understanding the poet’s choices of language, form and structure. Secondly, the students will be asked to compare the technical features of both poems to convey mood, meaning and ideas. The assessment will be 45 minutes long in an in-class assessment.

Year 11

 

 

Sept-Oct  (5 weeks)

Cluster poetry (Power & Conflict)

“Poetry is the lifeblood of rebellion, revolution, and the raising of consciousness.” —Alice Walker.

Students will be reading and exploring an anthology of 15 poems around the themes of power and conflict, in terms of war, nature, and relationships. They will develop comparisons in their analytical reading, thinking and writing about the poetry, showing their capacity to understand and comment on the poet’s use of language, structure and form to convey themes and ideas.

Students will be given one of the 15 poems from the anthology and asked to compare how the poets of this poem and one other from the anthology present their themes and ideas, looking closely at the impact of language, structure and form within their comparative analysis. This in-class assessment will be 45 mins long.

Oct-Nov (2 weeks)

Spoken Language Assessment

Students will be given the exciting opportunity to develop and deliver a speech on a topic of their choosing and agreed by their teacher. They will be encouraged to be brave in the presentation of their opinions and to use sophisticated vocabulary to express themselves and techniques to shape their speech in an interesting manner.

Students will present a five-minute speech within a small group setting, with their class teacher. In addition, they will need to respond to questions from their audience.

Oct-Dec (6 weeks)

An Inspector Calls

"as if we were all mixed up together like bees in a hive - community and all that nonsense"- Mr Birling.

Following on from investigating issues within society in the 19th century through Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, students will be encouraged to consider and respond to Priestley’s challenge to the issues faced by British society in the early 20th century.

Students will read and analyse Priestley’s play, considering the social and historical context; messages relating to morality; and the political structures within British society.

Students will broaden and develop their skills in writing analytically about the writer’s intentions and how they are evident in the choices of language, structure, form and characterisation in the play.

Students will be given a choice of two essay questions, one based on theme; one based on character. Students will be challenged to write analytically and evaluatively in an argumentative essay form in this closed-book, in-class assessment. It will last 45 minutes.

1-2 weeks

Spoken Language

Spoken Language assessments

Jan – Feb

Revision Literature papers 1 & 2

In class mock

Feb – Mar

Revision Language papers 1 & 2

In class mock

Apr – May

Revision for key areas identified from in class mocks.

 

June – July

 GCSE Exams

 

Homework

Homework will be set once a week and the time students are expected to spend on it is sixty minutes. The types of homework set can include: wider reading around a topic/subject we are studying, research in connection with a topic, literacy, or the class teacher may set something specific in connection with the tasks being completed in lessons. At GCSE level, we expect students to be revising key modules and areas of study straight away from the beginning of Year 10.

How it is assessed

English Language is assessed by means of two written exams sat at the end of the course.

  • Each paper is 1 hour and 45 minutes long.
  • Each paper is worth half of the total marks for the course.

English Literature is assessed by means of two written exams sat at the end of the course.

  • Paper 1 is 1 hour and 45 minutes long. This paper is worth 40% of the total marks for the course.
  • Paper 2 is 2 hours and 15 minutes long. This paper is worth 60% of the total marks for the course.

Spoken Language is assessed as part of the English Language course, but it does not contribute to the overall level. Students will deliver a talk, which is assessed by their teacher. The results will be recorded separately on the GCSE certificate as a Pass, Merit, Distinction or Not Classified.

Learning outside the classroom

Students are strongly encouraged to read around the subject in English Literature, investigating different ways of understanding character, plot and context for each of the set texts. Furthermore, using film and drama, students can find news ways to enjoy the presentation of these literary works in a more rounded manner. Teachers offer a range of links and opportunities to build students’ understanding of these texts as cultural artefacts and to broaden their experience of them in the context in which they are written as well as from the perspective of a modern reader or audience.

Parental support and extension

There are a range of films or theatre productions of the texts we study at GCSE. It will be very helpful for the students to see these prior to starting their GCSEs in Year 10. (A Christmas Carol, An Inspector Calls and Macbeth.)

More information

In terms of additional help that parents and carers can provide, please make sure that if you are able to, you ensure that your child uses a local public library to access as wide a range of reading material as possible. This is, of course, free. A dictionary and thesaurus are also excellent resources for students to have and to become accustomed to using when completing independent written tasks.

 

Everybody is somebody