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Food Preparation and Nutrition

Why we teach Food Preparation and Nutrition

Food and Nutrition is a varied subject to ensure pupils understand the importance of healthy eating and how to cook for themselves and others. Pupils will apply the principles of nutrition and health and understand how nutritional needs vary with age and health conditions. Pupils will also understand the source, seasonality and characteristics of a broad range of ingredients. Pupils will apply food safety principles to ensure the food they prepare and serve is safe to eat. We aim to instil a love of cooking that leads self-sufficiency and independence.

The aim is to ensure pupils achieve their expectations in a creative way by demonstrating a range of practical skills by preparing and cooking dishes as part of a balanced and affordable diet.

Key life skills learned in this subject include using digital scales, safe use of the cooker, hob and grill and knife techniques. Further practical skills will be gained throughout this course, such as sauce making, gluten formation and baking methods. We teach pupils that they gain a range of transferable skills in this course, such as time keeping, resilience, problem solving, patience and multitasking.

Knowledge learned includes pupils developing an understanding of individuals with specific lifestyle needs to include vegetarian; lacto-ovo, vegan, and those with religious beliefs that affect choice of diet, to include Hindu, Muslim and Jewish. Furthermore, pupils will learn how a balanced diet and analysing food labels support healthier food choices and mental wellbeing. Pupils are encouraged to consider the environmental and economic benefit of buying local and to think about the impact of food waste on the environment. This learning ensures pupils understand how food plays a large role in society and thus it is essential to become a healthy, knowledgeable, sustainable and responsible consumer.

Understanding how nutrition plays a vital role in ensuring one is healthy and free of diet related illnesses enables pupils to cook healthier for themselves and others. Pupils will be able to take the wide range of cooking skills and knowledge of nutrition, food safety, food choice, food provenance and food safety and apply this in lessons and beyond school life.

In key stage 4 pupils can choose the AQA Food, Preparation and Nutrition course to further practical skills and deepen knowledge and understanding of nutrition and health. This course is varied and contains an exam and two non- examined assessments. Key stage 4 pupils will explore the functional and chemical properties of a wide range of food commodities in greater detail.

By the end of Key Stage 4 pupils should be able to evaluate a food label, choose healthier choices and prepare a range of complex skilled dishes in a safe and sustainable way. Pupils should leave this course knowing where food comes from and how to live a healthier life.

KS3 Food Preparation and Nutrition

Overview of content

In Year 7, pupils can gain an array of practical skills through the preparation and making of a range of dishes. The aim in Year 7 is for pupils to become familiar with cookers and basic food safety principles. Pupils will be required to weigh and measure accurately, consider personal hygiene in a food preparation setting and understand the importance of washing and drying equipment. Pupils will also explore the importance of a balanced diet and choosing healthier options.

The aim in Year 8 is for pupils to become more independent when following a recipe and being able to modify a recipe to make it healthier or to serve fewer portions. Pupils will be expected to follow food safety principles. Pupils will identify the functions of ingredients used, selecting healthier choices and being able to cook family meals. Pupils will also explore how to minimise food waste and make affordable healthy meals.

The aim in Year 9 is for pupils to become confident in preparing and cooking of a variety of meals and could receive a ‘I can cook’ certificate. In addition, this year allows pupils to ask questions and explore the GCSE Food, preparation and nutrition course. Pupils will be involved in food investigations to determine how and why ingredients work. Furthermore, a range of medium- high level skills are pushed to challenge and push pupil ability.  Pupils will be expected to follow and apply high standards of food safety.

Yr 7 Programme of Study

 

Topics studied; skills and knowledge

How this will be assessed

Unit 1:

Taster Session (short introduction).

 

Equipment: understanding the range of equipment used in lessons.

Hygiene: importance of washing and drying equipment.

Skills: using digital scales, measurements of liquids, bridge and claw method.

Examples of dishes: vegetable crudities, eggs on toast, rock cakes.

N/A

Unit 2:

Methods of heat transfer.

Cooking methods: conduction, radiation and convection.

Hygiene and safety: personal hygiene, the role of temperature in bacteria growth.

Skills: cake making methods, use of oven, weighing and measuring.

Examples of practical dishes: pasta salad, cheese straws, scones.

1 x practical assessment toward end of unit.

1x written assessment toward end of unit.

Unit 3:

A balanced diet.

The Eatwell Guide: using this guide to explore and encourage healthier eating.

The importance of breakfast: breakfast is important to break the fast and research has proven it affects mood and mental well-being. 

Exploring functions of nutrients: why does our body need fats, proteins and carbohydrates. A closer look at fibre.

Skills: weighing and measuring, knife skills, presentation skills.

Examples of practical dishes: Chicken goujons, fruit breakfast muffins, scone-based pizza.

1 x practical assessment toward end of unit.

1x written assessment toward end of unit.

Yr 8 Programme of Study

 

Topics studied; skills and knowledge

How this will be assessed

Unit 1:

Caking making methods – recap on skills.

Personal hygiene and food safety: importance of ensuring high risks foods are kept in the fridge and ensuring food is cooked to the correct temperature.

Cake making methods: exploring the functions of ingredients in cake making; difference between margarine and butter, exploring why there are different types of sugar and flour used.

Skills: using digital scales, creaming method, melting method, grating, safe use of an electrical whisk.

Examples of dishes: Oat biscuits, swiss roll, fruit crumble, mini carrot cakes

1 practical assessment

1 written Assessment

Rotation 1: October 2021

Rotation 2: March 2022

Unit 2:

Eating for health

Diet related illnesses: Exploring the health of the U.K; obesity, type 2 diabetes and rickets are on the increase. Pupils will explore why this is and what is being done to help consumers make healthier choices.

The importance of nutrition: Pupils will explain why a balanced meal will provide a range of nutrients and why we need these.

Skills: Binding, gluten formation, shaping, kneading, meat preparation

Examples of dishes: breadsticks, chicken nuggets, jambalaya, bolognese

1 practical assessment

1 written assessment

Rotation 1: December 2021

Rotation 2: May 2022

Unit 3:

Family meals

Family meals on a budget: pupils will identify how to minimise food waste and to make meals on a budget. Pupils will modify meals to suit family tastes and preferences.

Skills: gelatinisation, shaping, vegetable preparation, meat preparation

Examples of dishes: Curry, meatballs, sausage rolls, cauliflower/macaroni cheese

1 practical assessment

1 written assessment

Rotation 1: February 2022

Rotation 2: July 2022

Yr 9 Programme of Study

 

Topics studied; skills and knowledge

How this will be assessed

Unit 1:

Science of food.

The science of food: Pupils will be involved in food investigations to determine how and why ingredients work. This provides pupils with a taster of what is expected in the GCSE course and pushes higher level thinking.

Skills: sensory analysis, mechanical aeration and working with a biological raising agent, gluten formation.

Food investigation: Which raising agent produces the best quality cake.

Examples of dishes: pizza, meringue drops, pear marble cake

1x practical assessment

1x written assessment

Rotation 1: October 2021

Rotation 2: December 2021

Unit 2:

Global cuisine

Exploring global cuisine: Pupils will explore where ingredients come from, linking to climate, culture and traditions. Different types of breads and their origins will be explored. Pupils will also recap on food provenance.

Skills: Pastry shaping, whisking, use of food processor.

Examples of dishes: Thai fishcakes, key lime pie, Mediterranean vegetable tarts

1 x practical assessment

1x written assessment

Rotation 1: Feb 2022

Rotation 2: March 2022

Unit 3:

Pushing skills and being a confident cook.

Identifying practical skills: Pupils will complete their KS3 food journal and receive a certificate. To receive the ‘I can cook’ certificate, pupils must complete their food journal to a high standard and identify they are confident in range of practical skills. Pupils will be encouraged to push higher level skills.

Food investigation: How does the choice of sugar affect taste, colour and appearance of food

Skills: Gluten formation, shaping choux, kneading, rubbing-in method

Examples of dishes: crown loaf, choux pastry, roasted vegetable lasagne 

1 x practical assessment

1x written assessment

Rotation 1: May 2022

Rotation 2: July 2022

Homework

Pupils will be required to produce one formal written homework per unit to link with taught content in lessons. In addition, pupils will be asked to research recipes, bring in additional ingredients and explore topical food issues on a weekly basis. Pupils are encouraged to self and peer assess skills and products at the end of each practical lesson.

In years 8 and 9 pupils will be required to keep a food journal to showcase skills, presentation, and outcomes.

Learning outside the classroom

Miss Giles has created a You-Tube channel, and pupils are encouraged to visit this channel prior to the lesson to observe methods and key tips; this is to increase pupil confidence and independence in lesson. Pupils are encouraged to watch Food documentaries and programmes, such as Food Unwrapped. And Masterchef.

Parental support and extension

If possible, pupils should use their learned skills at home to further confidence, independence and creativity. Parents can support pupils by encouraging healthier option choices of additional ingredients. All recipes used in lesson can be located on the CATalogue.

Website for recipes, healthy facts and foodie fun: https://www.foodafactoflife.org.uk/

More information

There are two options for ingredient provision for your child:

  1. Pay a requested contribution for basic storeroom ingredients and supply any additional ingredients that may be needed.
  2. Provide all ingredients for the practical activity.

Pupils are expected to bring a container for each practical lesson. A list of ingredients for each practical will be provided at the beginning of each unit to assist with organisation and provision of ingredients.

KS4 Food Preparation and Nutrition

 AQA Food, Preparation and Nutrition (8585)

Overview of content

In this creative and varied Food and Nutrition course, pupils will demonstrate effective and safe high-level cooking skills by planning and preparing dishes using a variety of cooking techniques, technical skills and equipment.

Pupils will develop knowledge and understanding of the functional properties, chemical processes and nutritional content of foods. Pupils are also taught the relationship between diet, nutrition and health, the essential steps to ensure food is safe to eat, the origin of food commodities and why people choose the food they consume.

Programme of Study

Year

Half term

Topics studied; skills and knowledge

How this will be assessed

10

Autumn - 1

Eatwell Guide and the 8 healthy eating guidelines – how to apply these to everyday life.

Macronutrients and micronutrients – functions, sources, deficiencies and excess

Nutrition and life stages – how nutrition requirements change throughout life

Practical unit: Introduction to GCSE food skills. Example of practical dishes: Chocolate and fruit torte, raspberry roulade and homemade mayonnaise

End of term nutrition test & practical exam

Autumn - 2

Exploring diet related illness – type two diabetes, obesity, rickets, osteoporosis, coronary heart disease, anaemia, dental caries and eating disorders

Antioxidants – the important role they play for the body

Practical unit: Exploring raising agents – the science. Example of dishes: Soda bread & homemade butter, focaccia bread, Paris-brest

End of term nutrition and health test & practical exam

Spring - 1

Food safety principles – ensuring food is safe to eat through purchase, storage, preparation, cooking

Food poisoning bacteria – symptoms and types

Microorganisms used in food production – cheese, yogurt, bread

Global cuisine project practical task. Example of dishes: Sweet and sour chicken, cottage pie, roasted vegetable lasagne

End of term food safety test & practical exam

Spring - 2

Food choice – physiological and psychological reasons. Religion and food choice

Food labels – how to read the information and mandatory information

Global cuisine project practical task. Example of dishes: Korma, naan bread, samosa, Greek salad

End of term food choice test & practical exam

Summer - 1

Food provenance – where food comes from and how climate affects food security

Exploring a wide range or ethical and moral issues relating to food production and choice

Exploring dough. Example of dishes: Pizza, pasta and sauce, fruit tart.

End of term food provenance test & practical exam

Summer - 2

Food science and exam technique – pupils will recap on food science terms used in practical lessons and working through a range of past paper questions

Pushing skills: Custard tarts, honeycomb, Strawberry mousse

End of term food science test & practical exam

End of Year 10 assessment

11

Autumn - 1

Non-examined assessment (NEA) 1 – Food investigation

End of term test to cover nutrition, food safety, food provenance, food choice and food science

Autumn - 2

NEA 2 – food preparation assessment 

Year 11 mock – past paper

Spring - 1

NEA 2

End of term test to cover Nutrition, food safety, food provenance, food choice and food science

Spring - 2

PRACTICAL EXAMS – 3-hour practical exam (NEA 2)

End of term test to cover Nutrition, food safety, food provenance, food choice and food science

Summer - 1

Preparing for the exam – revision, past paper questions

End of term test to cover Nutrition, food safety, food provenance, food choice and food science

Summer - 2

Period of Formal Examinations

 

Homework

Pupils are expected to research and read recipes prior to the lesson; recipes used in lesson are found on the CATalogue. Pupils will be asked to complete a wide range of tasks for homework, such as research projects, recipe ideas, worksheets and engage with the Seneca learning platform. The aim is to set a formal homework every two weeks, although the expectation is that pupils read and check recipes once a week.

How it is assessed

A 1 hour 45-minute written exam, worth 100 marks, makes up 50% of the GCSE. 50% of the GCSE is made up of two non-examined assessments:

Task 1: Food investigation (30 marks)

Pupils' understanding of the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of ingredients.

Task 2: Food preparation assessment (70 marks)

Pupils' knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to the planning, preparation, cooking, presentation of food and application of nutrition related to the chosen task. Pupils will prepare, cook and present a final menu of three dishes within a single period of no more than three hours, planning how this will be achieved.

Learning outside the classroom

Pupils are encouraged to cook at home to enhance practical skills, time management and confidence. Pupils are also encouraged to keep-up-to date with latest food trends, health news and to engage with the many food programmes available; pupils are directed towards relevant content in lesson. In year 11, a food club will be offered to pupils to enhance practical skills. It is also encouraged that pupils read food labels to further understand nutrition, food choice and ingredients. In addition, following celebrity chefs on social media platforms can inspire pupils.

Parental support and extension

Parents can ensure they print/have access to the ingredient plan for Year 10, located on the CATalogue, to ensure pupils understand the recipe requirements and any additional ingredients required for the lesson. In year 11, pupils will have a three-hour practical exam; parents can support this by allowing pupils to practise key skills and dishes at home.

Nutrition is a complex field and pupils are advised to only use credible website sources to gather information for research tasks. In addition, using the resources and encouraging pupils to use this will extend knowledge. Some websites that are extremely helpful are:

https://www.nutrition.org.uk/

https://www.foodafactoflife.org.uk/

https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/

https://thecookeryteacher.com/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCswAs3zvkLgKrpRIsfvOOAQ

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/z7fw7p3/revision/2

https://www.bbc.co.uk/food

Also, parents should encourage cooking and baking at home. All families are welcome to borrow any of the recipe books available in the Food and Nutrition library. Recipe books range from slow cooker type meals to ‘fakeaway’ ideas.

More information

It is helpful for parents to support pupils by providing the relevant size containers, additional ingredients and baking dishes. Please note that due to 1-hour lesson, some recipes may have to be scaled down, therefore, reducing portion size down is key in ensuring a successful practical. Some practical dishes take longer than 1 hour; therefore, this practical dish may be spilt over two lessons.

Pasta machines and other specialist equipment may be borrowed from the food room.

A technician is also available during practical lessons as an additional level of support.

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